Henna Recipe #2

After my last henna application last month I literally counted down the days (remember when I told you I made countdowns for everything?) until my next henna application. Well my lovely JGAers, the time for henna round 2 has finally arrived. Last night I mixed up the following henna paste.

What I used

This time around I used green tea, jamila henna (2 boxes), and coconut milk.

Green tea, Jamila henna, coconut milk

The last time I hennaed my hair I used rajasthani indian henna, indigo, coconut milk, conditioner, and boiled water. Since I wanted more reddish/burdundy tones this round, I ditched the indigo (because using henna + indigo creates brown tones) and I opted to use jamila henna instead because it has a higher lawsone content. Lawsone are the dye molecules in henna. The higher the lawsone content, the redder the stain. Rajasthani indian henna has a lawsone content of 2.59% and jamila henna has a lawsone content of 2.7%. I also left out the conditioner because the addition of conditioner to henna makes a henna gloss and reduces dye deposit.

Read: My First Henna Recipe

Jamila henna (2 boxes)

Here’s what I did

Step 1:

I mixed 2 boxes of jamila henna (200g) + 1 can of coconut milk in a bowl. I don’t think I used enough coconut milk for 200g of henna because I ended up the super chunky mixture you see below instead of a creamy paste.

Consistency after added coconut milkStep 2:

For dye release (and to thin my chunky henna paste) I added green tea. I wasn’t sure how much green tea I’d need to achieve pancake batter consistency so I started slowly in 1/4 cup increments. I ended up adding a total of 2 cups.

Added 2 cups of green tea

Step 3:

Mix, mix, mix, mix, mix . . . shake out arm . . . mix, mix, mix, mix, mix . . . pause to rewind scene in The Mindy Project . . . mix, mix, mix.

Henna cake batter-ish consistency

Step 4:

Once I’d finished mixing my henna paste, I covered the bowl with cling wrap and let it sit for 4 hours.

Sling wrap after mixing

Just like last time, I was all stressed out when it came time to figure out whether my henna was to apply. Here’s the note I relied on: “henna may be slightly browned when there has been a dye release. Is the henna below the surface a different color from the top? Dig into the henna with a spoon and see if the middle of the henna is a different green from the part that’s been in contact with the air. If the surface is darkened, lawsone molecules have been released and have oxidized where they were in contact with air.” – Henna for Hair, by Dr. Catherine Cartwright-Jones Source

I stood in my bathroom for 5 minutes squinting at the bowl above trying to figure out if the color of the inside of my henna paste was reeeeallly different from the surface. I figured it was close enough (basically I was too tried to keep fretting out it) and rolled with it.

I’ll share the application process and results tomorrow! Toodles!

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Henna recipe 2 collage

7 Comments

  1. Hey Jen, where do you purchase your coconut milk? I can’t seem to find it ANYWHERE on the ground.

    1. Author

      Either at my local Indian grocery or Hispanic grocery store.

  2. I would say you don’t have to worry so much about what the henna looks like and how much it’s darkened after you let it sit overnight. Especially if it was covered, as I’ve found it usually continues to darken as it’s exposed to air. Any time from 8-18 hours will give you good color deposit.

    1. Author

      Ohhh that’s great to know! I definitely won’t worry about it when I do another henna application in about a week.

  3. Looks like a good mix. I haven’t used green tea or coconut milk, but the properties of each should result in a great outcome, and for hair health too.
    Gonna check out the results! Excited for you!

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